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Lensculture Posts BSG’s Niagara from Thousands of Worldwide Images

Greff-Barry_Niagara.jpgNiagara, Barry Steven Greff

Lensculture is one of the largest destinations for curated, contemporary photography from around the world. Will Coldwell, writing in The Independent in 2013, described LensCulture as one of the ten best photography websites, calling it a “definitive resource for anyone who wants to keep up with the latest trends and debates in contemporary photography.”[4] Critic Sean O’Hagan, writing in The Guardian in 2012, listed it among the eight best photography websites or online publications, calling it “one of the most authoritative and wide-ranging sites.”[5]

Barry Steven Greff’s Niagara has been selected by Lenscultures’ editors to be featured in their Black & White Photography Awards 2019 Competition Gallery, visible to everyone who visits the website. “The Competition Gallery is a highly curated group of images selected by our editors to showcase only the best photos from entrants who are creating very strong work among our global community of photographers. This is an impressive accomplishment considering we get thousands of submissions from 160 countries.”

Usually a Straight Shooter, Sometimes, my Imagination Runs Wild.

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Fantasy Island, Many Locations, Over Many Years

I am primarily a straight shooter, I try to capture what I see. There is often some type of post-production required, but again, with my subjects being natural, I try to keep them that way.

Every once in a while, I have been known to create something that I saw, but only in my mind’s eye. Case in point, Fantasy Island. A composite image of various portions of many different images I have created that come together in an M.C. Escher..esque type fantasy. Taken over many years in places from Niagara Falls to Carlsbad, California, an Oregon lake to a waterfall in Boulder, Colorado and many more. Following the image around, water flows down then up again, there is a full moon, yet lightning strikes in the distance. Horseback riders on a Washington State beach, mystic lake boaters and even a Roseate Spoonbill from the Florida Everglades flying across the scene.

Taken together, this an example of how the overly creative side of my mind works. The black and white helps produce the seamless nature of the composition, the rest of it, I can’t really explain…it just happens.

BSG’s “Niagara” Recognized in Photo +, PDN’s 2016 EXPOSURE Awards

This week I am honored to have my image “Niagara” chosen as the winner in the “Natural Forces” category in Photo+, Photo District News’ (PDN’s) sixth annual EXPOSURE Photograhy Awards. Billed as a “global celebration of photography,” it truly was as winners of other categories hailed from: INDIA, LONDON, BANGLADESH,  SAMOA, SOUTH KOREA, AUSTRALIA, CANADA, BRAZIL,

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NiagaraNiagara, 2006

JAPAN, ITALY, BAVARIA, HUNGARY, NORWAY, FRANCE, PUERTO RICO, RUSSIA and PORTUGAL.

To see the other honored images visit: EXPOSURE Awards

As always, I greatly appreciate the recognition.

Diary of a Fine Art Print / Amongst other things, it’s all in the Details

Niagara                                                                  Niagara, 2006

Niagara people and bird

(Cropped portion of people and bird from- Niagara, 2006)

The discussion as to what makes a Fine Art photograph is one for the ages. I have long respected the genre and have worked diligently to hone my craft. Although there are various definitions of what makes a photograph fine art, I subscribe to a more tradional theory that such an image is created with an aesthetic intention, that the value lies primarily in its beauty, rather than for journalistic, editorial or commercial purposes. I also believe that the image should tell a story, be unique, iconic, powerful…or all of the above. As beauty lies in the eye of the beholder, so goes a fine art photograph which usually entails vetting by those respected in the field. Knowing this, I fearlessly spent my early years placing my work in front of some of the most well respected photographers, gallerists, curators and collectors in the business. With the help of their support, the work was widely published in fine art magazines, exhibited in galleries across the U.S. and over time, a significant resume was built.

I believe that one of my signature images, Niagara, clearly exemplifies these equalities (shot from atop a hotel two miles away to capture this angle)… It has countinously been singled out by many of those alluded to above, in that the composition juxtaposing the grandeur of the falls with the minutia of the toursists indicates just how small we humans are in comparison to the forces of Mother Nature.

After getting past the composition (and then lighting, both of which cannot be adequately discussed in a blog post, if at all), I personally take significant pride in capturing the exacting details of a scene, whether it be the people in this image or the fine feathers in one of my close-up animal portraits.

Then, finally, and consistent with the teachings of the great Ansel Adams himself, capturing the image is only one half of the process. The printing (again, not something that can be covered here), is crucial to the creation of a fine art photographic print. Being true to the process, I hand print each of my images (up to 17″ x 22″) on a professional Epson 3800 printer using Hahnemuhle Fine Art Pearl paper and I personally oversee the larger prints to make sure they are color correct (again, another significant concern for another day) and that they print without a single unexpected blemish.

Finally, I pride myself on the key details of my images being “tack” sharp, as exemplified by the enlarged cropped portion of the image above. Although some of the older images can go only so far, as a perfectionist, I have gone through an entire roll of paper (athough thankfully not often) in order to ultimately create a single large print for a collector, and to my exacting standards. When a gallerist who regularly sells the work of masters such as Ansel Adams and Edward Weston calls my prints “magic,” I know that I am doing something right.

Hence, there are many sources by which one can obtain a Fine Art print. I simply offer one that is created in my mind’s eye…and always from my heart. It is universally accepted that the first rule of collecting fine art photographyy is to actually enjoy the work. Hence, I strive to create images that make the viewer not only think…but feel, and I have been honored to have satisfied a wide array of selective collectors, and look forward to doing so for many others in the future.

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Not That Black and White / Moved by the Classics

Dark Descent

Dark Descent, Niagara Falls, 2006

1 417 w Waterfall Milton closeup 7524 BW

Milton Falls, OH 2013

Wild River FINAL

Wild River, Rocky Mountains, CO 2010

As many of you who follow my blog know, my posts are generated from various forms of inspiration. Recently, I connected online with an individual who sells Fine Art Photography created by some of the true legends of the genre. Jeff Appel, who was kind enough to take the time to look at my work, has a web site at http://www.photographypastandpresent.com/ and FB page at https://www.facebook.com/jeffemilyappel. He has a working relationship with many of the masters of the art form, individuals whom I have long admired. From John Sexton, Roger Ballen, Roman Loranc to Cole Thompson and Camille Seaman. Jeff has impeccable photographic taste and seems to be the go-to guy for prints from many of the classic Fine Art Photographers. Several of his recent postings of classic black and white images, feature water scenes, often exhibiting motion.

Some of these classic images have moved me to re-post some of my own visions of the beauty of water. These are some of my favorite to create, the juxtiposition of the soft white moving water, often against hard dark rocks represent a time honored tradition of Fine Art Photography, one that I don’t take lightly.

Created by using a tripod, in muted light, the timing of the shutter release is critical to avoid blowing out the whites of the water, a talent that is honed over time and something I pride myself on capturing.

So, if you haven’t found what you ar looking for within the portfolios at http://www.barrystevengreff.com, check out Jeff’s site to view work from some of the legends as well as other great artists he works with, the images are truly ….moving.

And Now for Something Completely Different / Time for a Change

9 Concept BarryGreff_FantasyIsland

Fantasy Island, Ode to M.C. Escher, 2006-2010

Albert Einstein is attributed with the clever quote: “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results.” Although it has come into question as to whether or not he actually said it, it is still both catchy and thought-provoking.

After an absolutely awful year of health, which is still challenging me through the new year, it leads me to think it would be insane not to try something new going forward. That being said, my work has always been known for its rendition of Mother Earth’s natural beauty with very little, if any, help from post production “magic.” Notwithstanding, over the years, I have (secretly) dabbled in the creation of scenes which have been born in my mind’s eye and then generated from several composite images I have captured over time.

Hence, for the first time seen beyond my eyes, one of my more complicated compilations, Fantasy Island. Created from over a dozen images taken over several years, this is truly one that the viewer can see new things at every different turn. Produced in the mystical style of M.C. Escher, following the composition around, brings you back to the beginning…or does it? It’s enough to drive you insane.

One of a Kind / Commemorating a Very Special Young Man

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Lone Tree at Sunset, 2004                                    WMC TICU Private Consult Room

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WMC TICU Lobby / Lounge                                      Commemorative Plaque

I have participated in more than a dozen Gallery Exhibitions around the country including a Solo Exhibition in NYC. I have been published in most of the major Fine Art Photography magazines and have enjoyed the support of some of the legends of the industry. All that means a great deal to me…but recently I had the honor of participating in a project that not only will make the lives better for the families of those that will find themselves at the Westchester Medical Center TICU (Trauma Intensive Care Unit)…but was created and dedicated to an incredibly special young man, Evan Lieberman.

That some of my work graces the walls of this beautiful, and more importantly, calm and functional space, is truly special. Built from the tireless efforts of Evan’s family through Evan’s Team which they created in his memory as a group effort committed to helping the community  http://www.evansteamny.com/ they hold regular events such as mud runs, golf tournaments, poker nights and the like, raising funds so that along with the Westchester Medical Center http://www.westchestermedicalcenter.com/, they have created a comfortably practical and contemplative space for the families of TICU patients.

My image above, which is part of the project, is entitled Lone Tree at Sunset. It is especially appropriate to have been included in the project because Evan Lieberman…was truly one of a kind.

Images of WMC TICU © Ben Cotten 2015.

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