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Archive for the ‘Landscapes’ Category

The Art of the Sea from the Motion of the Ocean

When most people look at the ocean they see the waves as they ebb and flow. Although most find it enjoyable to the senses, something additional happens to me. I tend to follow the actions of the

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Ebb and Flow, Deerfield Beach 2013

waves as they come ashore and then again as they retreat back out. I also gravitate to those sea shores that contain rocks, piers or any other solid structures around which the water must traverse. I visually slow the motion of the water down in my mind’s eye and foresee the beautiful form it takes as it surrounds the rocks or pylons in its way.

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Time and Tide Wait For No Man, Deerfield Beach, FL 2013

Using a tripod during the dawn or dusk hours I can capture the slowed down motion of the water as it crests and eventually hits the beach and returns from whence it came. Seeing the scene in advance helps me create the final image and timing is everything.

I am sure that for all eternity, one of my favorite forms of art…will be that of the Sea.

Granite Flow on a Rainy Day

Another black and white image of water flowing downward over and around hard granite rock in the beautiful state of Colorado. Although I usually stay away from even the slightest political

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Granite Flow, Boulder, Colorado 2008

reference in my photography, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to achieve considering the way things are going, which certainly wouldn’t be described as smooth.

Notwithstanding, in my work I always try to concentrate on the natural beauty that has (so far) survived all that has occurred around it. This image was created on a rainy day, just outside the classic Colorado city of Boulder. The muted sky allows for the tripod mounted camera’s shutter to remain open long enough to slow down the motion of the water and the rain emphasizes the sharp detail of the granite rock.

Here’s to hoping things around us flow more smoothly going forward… although as I hear myself write it, I recognize just how hard it will be to achieve.

Flowing Downward / Rocky Mountains

A classic black and white image of a mighty river flowing downward in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.

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Downward Flow, Colorado 2010

After a particularly snowy winter, the melting runoff created a powerful flow down river. Captured using a tripod from a bridge over the river, the slow shutter speed caught the motion of the rushing water as it made its way around boulders and fallen trees.

Happy New Year 2017

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Torch Run, New Years Eve, Keystone, CO 2007

An image that has always represented the celebration of the New Year to me was capturing the “Torch Run” on the slopes of Keystone, Colorado on New Years Eve ten years ago this year. As the clock struck midnight, skiers, holding red flares, slowly came down the slope in a wide “S” formation. The resulting scene was spectacular to behold live.

Due to the darkness of night and the motion of the skiers, it took quick experimentation to capture just enough blur to show the movement, while maintaining enough detail to see some of the individual skiiers holding up their flares.

This was clearly an image I pictured in my mind before taking it, and had set up my tripod at the bottom of the mountain at the correct angle to capture the snaking skiers.

Here’s hoping the future year…is a bright one, I could certainly use one about now.

BSG’s “Niagara” Recognized in Photo +, PDN’s 2016 EXPOSURE Awards

This week I am honored to have my image “Niagara” chosen as the winner in the “Natural Forces” category in Photo+, Photo District News’ (PDN’s) sixth annual EXPOSURE Photograhy Awards. Billed as a “global celebration of photography,” it truly was as winners of other categories hailed from: INDIA, LONDON, BANGLADESH,  SAMOA, SOUTH KOREA, AUSTRALIA, CANADA, BRAZIL,

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NiagaraNiagara, 2006

JAPAN, ITALY, BAVARIA, HUNGARY, NORWAY, FRANCE, PUERTO RICO, RUSSIA and PORTUGAL.

To see the other honored images visit: EXPOSURE Awards

As always, I greatly appreciate the recognition.

After the Storm / Surf’s Up / Time to Shoot

As indicated in the last post, as a long time resident of South Florida, if you pay attention to the local media broadcasts, you can maintain a pretty good idea as to what, if any, effects a storm will have on your area.

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Goodnight Irene, Deerfield Beach, FL 2011

As often happens, it is not until late in the game that the storm takes a wobble one way or another. Matthew went 30 miles west just before passing South Florida, resulting in 100 miles between the eye and us. That turned out to be good news for our area, only downing some branches, and the occasional tree uprooted by a strong gust.

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       Sunrise after Sandy, Stuart, FL 2012

Notwithstanding, in the past I have gone to the beach to shoot after the danger has subsided and created some classic images. The sky is eerily beautiful and the waves are always strong (hopefully not too strong because the storm surge is often as damaging as the wind).

Not feeling up to it this time, here are a few from some former storms. Until the next one.

U. S. National Park Service Celebrates 100 Years Today

On August 25, 2016, the U. S. National Park Service turns 100 years old. By the Act of March 1, 1872, Congress established Yellowstone National Park in the Territories of Montana and Wyoming “as a public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people” and placed it

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River of Fallen Trees, Yellowstone National Park, 2010

“under exclusive control of the Secretary of the Interior.” The founding of Yellowstone National Park began a worldwide national park movement. initially, these parks were run by various government agencies so No single agency provided unified management of the varied federal parklands. On August 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the act creating the National Park Service http://www.nps.gov, a federal bureau in the Department of the Interior

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Bison, King of the Mountain, Yellowstone National Park, WY 2010

responsible for protecting the 35 national parks and monuments then managed by the department and those yet to be established.

Over the years I have had the privilege of visiting several of these jewels. Yellowstone has so much diversity to offer. Its variety and abundance of wildlife; steaming, colorful, prismatic springs and gushing geysers to name a few. The Visitor Center at Old Faithful actually has a clock on the wall that notifies visitors of eruption times within a few minutes either way. Now… there’s an App for that….assuming you can get service in the Park, you can time your visits to make sure you capture an eruption.

So, Happy 100th to the National Park Service. Here’s wishing it many more centennials of protecting these magnificent, natural wonders. Here’s also hoping they are still around to be enjoyed by our children and our children’s children. For this folks… is Mother Nature at her absolute finest.

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