Archive

Archive for the ‘Cityscapes’ Category

Duncan Miller Gallery, Los Angeles recognizes Barry Steven Greff’s image: Rush Hour, Grand Central Station in their Your Daily Photograph

rush-hour-grand-central-station-smart-fix-lite-final-1000wRush Hour, Grand Central Station, NYC 2009

© Barry Steven Greff

Duncan Miller Gallery in LA runs an on-line gallery called Your Daily Photograph. YDP is “An invaluable resource for collectors of fine art photography.

Again, for the second time, YDP curators have chosen a BSG image, “Rush Hour, Grand Central Station” for inclusion on YDP. see: Your Daily Photograph .

Recent images from photography masters Henri Cartier-Bresson, Andreas Gursky, Richard Misrach, Andre Kertesz, Edward Burtynsky and other photography legends have appeared in YDP. YourDailyPhotograph.com only selects a very small percentage of photographs submitted. On this particular YDP, Barry’s image is posted under Edward Weston‘s Chambered Nautilus, one of a handful of the most recognizable (and expensive when a signed original) fine art photographs ever created.

Classic images can  be viewed daily at: http://www.yourdailyphotograph.com/

The main web-site for the Gallery is at: http://www.duncanmillergallery.com/ and in addition to their Los Angeles gallery, they now have a new, second location in Santa Monica, CA.

As usual, I am grateful for the recognition from such a prestigious gallery.

Barry Steven Greff Photography
www.barrystevengreff.com

Thunder Road / Diary of a Storm / Approaching Destruction

For those of you that do not live in South Florida, or on the southeast coast, you are most likely unaware of our “hurricane protocol.” As Hurricane Matthew approaches within the next 24 hours, I thought I would reflect on what we have become accustomed to with these storms.

4 Beautiful Storm US 27 Vert_6733

Thunder Road, Weston, FL 2013

Unlike other major weather events around the country we have the advantage of “notice.” We know a hurricane is approaching within a few days. The actual path, intensity and final landfall are still speculation to the weather experts until almost the last-minute. Even though the news stations broadcast 24 hours a day about the storm, showing its “projected” track, it is not until just before it reaches us that we know who it will hit and how hard. A slight “wobble” east or west can make all the difference in the world but when the male weather forecasters remove their sports jackets and roll up their sleeves, you know we are in for a rough ride.

best-storm-3-fixed

The Wind of Wilma, Weston, FL 2005

In Andrew I took a hit, while my friend’s homes a bit further south were obliterated. The aftermath looked like a bomb had detonated, even the street signs were gone and it was almost impossible to navigate. As time goes on, your luck runs out and for Wilma, I was ground zero. To see your pool screen being ripped and mangled out of the ground and your large trees being uprooted is a surreal experience. The wind sounds like a fright train, the exterior walls move in and out and your front door rattles as if it will burst open (if it does, you’re toast). Finally, when the heavy, attached cement barrel tiles start to rip off your roof, you know you are close to disaster. That’s when we grabbed a mattress and hunkered down underneath it as far away from any windows as possible. Luckily, Wilma stopped just short of total disaster, but still took several years to come back from.

Going, Going…Gone, Wilma, Weston FL 2005

Thankfully, we have lived through the storms we have faced so far and hopefully will do so with Matthew, which is bearing down on us right now. The anticpation of its arrival motivated me to  get this post out while I still had power…and a roof.

hood-damage005-417

The Power of Mother Nature, Wilma, Weston, FL 2005

Here’s hoping that we just experience some really bad weather without the potential destruction it can bring… until the next one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BSG Featured in Photo District News September Print Issue

Photo District News (PDN), the award-winning monthly magazine for the professional photographer, has been covering the professional photographic industry for over three decades. No other brand covers professional photography like Photo District News. A trusted, unbiased Cover

Ad FINAL

Cab Ride in the Rain, NYC, NY 2009 (Featured in the Issue)

source of news and info on photography for over 30 years. Every month, PDN magazine delivers unbiased news and analysis, interviews, photography portfolios, and information photographers need to survive in a competitive business.

PDNonline covers breaking news stories and delivers in-depth features on the photo industry, including interviews and profiles, reports on new products, and information on useful sources for professional photographers. PDNOnline’s photo essays and galleries explore the work of photography’s masters and today’s emerging talent.

Subscribe at: http://pdnonline.com/      Additional work can be viewed at: http://www.barrystevengreff.com and http://www.adventuresfrombehindtheglass.com

 

 

Categories: Cityscapes, Lifestyles

_________________INDEPENDENCE DAY 2016__________________

“Whose broad stripes and bright stars, Through the perilous fight, O’er the ramparts we watched, Were so gallantly streaming”..More stars than in 1814 when Francis Scott Key wrote those words, but this is my version of the image upon which they are based.

Flag Full

Broad stripes and bright stars, so gallantly streaming, 2014

 Here’s to independence….it cannot be overrated.

Meet me in St. Louis…at least my work.

St. Louis Fine Print Fair – May 6-8, 2016

CITYSCAPES

30 Rock

 Touch the Sky, 30 Rock

Cab Ride in the Rain, NYC 2009

Cab Ride in the Rain, NYC

Seascapes 2 labeled

This weekend, from May 6 through May 8, is the 10th annual St. Louis Fine Print Fair http://bit.ly/R5eI8K. Stop by the booth of photography addict/rep, Jeff Appel of Photography Past & Present, Missouri http://www.photographypastandpresent.com/ to see the work of some highly respected photographers as well as some terrific emerging artists.

Jeff works with many prestigious photographers such as Roger Ballen, Paul Caponigro, John Sexton, Jock Sturges, Roman Loranc and Alan Ross, who was Ansel Adam’s photographic assistant. Other artists such as Cole and Kim Weston, whose father was the famed 20th Century photographer Edward Weston, have created great work themselves. Finally, Jeff works with some talented emerging and/or mid-career artists such as Camille Seaman and…yes, Barry Steven Greff. The four images above will be available at the fair and many others can be viewed at http://www.barrystevengreff.com. So, “Meet me in St. Louis” (sort of) this weekend. Anyone interested in getting on the guest list can reach Jeff through his website or on FB at http://bit.ly/1WECQN7. Friday night is a Silent Auction and Preview Party from 6-9 pm.

So if you happen to be in Ole St. Lou, stop by and see Jeff…and tell him Barry sent you.

 

Diary of a Fine Art Print / Amongst other things, it’s all in the Details

Niagara                                                                  Niagara, 2006

Niagara people and bird

(Cropped portion of people and bird from- Niagara, 2006)

The discussion as to what makes a Fine Art photograph is one for the ages. I have long respected the genre and have worked diligently to hone my craft. Although there are various definitions of what makes a photograph fine art, I subscribe to a more tradional theory that such an image is created with an aesthetic intention, that the value lies primarily in its beauty, rather than for journalistic, editorial or commercial purposes. I also believe that the image should tell a story, be unique, iconic, powerful…or all of the above. As beauty lies in the eye of the beholder, so goes a fine art photograph which usually entails vetting by those respected in the field. Knowing this, I fearlessly spent my early years placing my work in front of some of the most well respected photographers, gallerists, curators and collectors in the business. With the help of their support, the work was widely published in fine art magazines, exhibited in galleries across the U.S. and over time, a significant resume was built.

I believe that one of my signature images, Niagara, clearly exemplifies these equalities (shot from atop a hotel two miles away to capture this angle)… It has countinously been singled out by many of those alluded to above, in that the composition juxtaposing the grandeur of the falls with the minutia of the toursists indicates just how small we humans are in comparison to the forces of Mother Nature.

After getting past the composition (and then lighting, both of which cannot be adequately discussed in a blog post, if at all), I personally take significant pride in capturing the exacting details of a scene, whether it be the people in this image or the fine feathers in one of my close-up animal portraits.

Then, finally, and consistent with the teachings of the great Ansel Adams himself, capturing the image is only one half of the process. The printing (again, not something that can be covered here), is crucial to the creation of a fine art photographic print. Being true to the process, I hand print each of my images (up to 17″ x 22″) on a professional Epson 3800 printer using Hahnemuhle Fine Art Pearl paper and I personally oversee the larger prints to make sure they are color correct (again, another significant concern for another day) and that they print without a single unexpected blemish.

Finally, I pride myself on the key details of my images being “tack” sharp, as exemplified by the enlarged cropped portion of the image above. Although some of the older images can go only so far, as a perfectionist, I have gone through an entire roll of paper (athough thankfully not often) in order to ultimately create a single large print for a collector, and to my exacting standards. When a gallerist who regularly sells the work of masters such as Ansel Adams and Edward Weston calls my prints “magic,” I know that I am doing something right.

Hence, there are many sources by which one can obtain a Fine Art print. I simply offer one that is created in my mind’s eye…and always from my heart. It is universally accepted that the first rule of collecting fine art photographyy is to actually enjoy the work. Hence, I strive to create images that make the viewer not only think…but feel, and I have been honored to have satisfied a wide array of selective collectors, and look forward to doing so for many others in the future.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colors of the City / Broadway Lights

Cab Ride in the Rain, NYC 2009

Cab Ride in the Rain, Radio City Music Hall, NYC 2009

The Night Belongs to Phantom 600

Tonight Belongs to Phantom, NYC 2008

Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway 9922

Don’t Let the Lights Go Out on Broadway, NYC 2012

As a photographer, even one whose first love is nature, I never could walk around the streets of Manhattan at night without a camera. The constant motion of the yellow cabs, the continuously changing mega screens in Times Square and  even the lit billboards, create a canvas of possibiities to make a great image come to life. Cab Ride, shot from the back seat of a Yellow Cab as the CNN cast scrolled by, took several drives around the corner to get just what I was looking for.

Phantom was much easier to shoot as long as I avoided being run over by any one of the various forms of NYC’s transportation vehicles such as taxis, limos, or tricked out bicycle chariot/rickshaws.

Finally, being able to spread out tripod legs and use a long lens allowed me to capture an electrician repairing a single light amongst millions in the heart of Times Square. Timing the capture was critical to its composition because the images on the screens changed every few seconds. Clearly, this man’s job was to make sure… the lights don’t go out on Broadway (nod to Billy Joel).

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Cityscapes, Lifestyles
%d bloggers like this: